There are three basic stitch types that are used for all embroidery:
 
Running stitches
These are also known as walk stitches and are single line stitches which run one stitch between two needle penetration point. A running stitch goes from point A to point B. They are used for very fine detail and also for underlay.
There are different variations of running stitches such as two-ply and bean.
*     A two-ply stitch is a running stitch that goes from point A to point B and then goes back from point B to point A and stops.
*    A bean stitch is a running stitch that goes from point A to point B and then goes back from point B to point A and then goes forward from point A to point B. The differences are in the thickness of the different variations.


Satin Stitches
Satin stitches are nothing more than zig-zag stitches. A satin stitch can range in thickness from just over 1mm to usually a maximum of 12mm. A satin stitch is normally used for nice detail and for most normal size lettering.

Fill Stiches
A fill stitch is used to cover a large area in a design. Fill stitches are a series of running stitches aligned together to create a solid area of coverage in the design. Fill stitches can be aligned to create patterns or they can change direction to provide different effects from within the design.

In addition to different stitch types, the other factors a digitizer has to deal with are density, stitch directions and stitch lengths.

The stitch directions and stitch lengths enable the digitizer to create different effects with the stitch types just described.

The density refers to stitches per inch. The greater the density, the more stitches will be used within that defined area.

A good technique for a digitizer is to use a greater amount of underlay to stabilize the material and allow for less density to be used in the particular segment of the design. Read a supporting article on STABILIZERS elsewhere on this blog.