Tips, Tricks and Information on
MACHINE EMBROIDERY



Showing category "Machine Embroidery Problems" (Show all posts)

SECRETS TO SUCCESSFUL MACHINE EMBROIDERY

Posted by Myra Bosch on Saturday, January 23, 2010, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

Are there any secrets for stitching out beautiful embroideries? I’m referring to those embroideries which do not have any puckers, where the top thread and the bobbin thread remain within their own parameters and where we are not testing the stitchouts time and again to achieve that sought after perfection.

The answer is YES, definitely YES. A design is nothing more than stitches. Our embroidery machine is the means to achieving that embroidery and that is where we need to be prepared before...
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POSITION OF THE PRESSER FOOT MAKES A DIFFERENCE

Posted by Myra Bosch on Saturday, January 16, 2010, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

Properly threading the sewing machine is the first step to having a machine that will sew correctly.

Whenever you are threading a sewing machine, one basic rule to every sewing machine is to thread the machine with the presser foot up.

When the presser foot is raised, the tension disks are disengaged. Being disengaged allows the thread to go in to the tension disks and seat properly.

If you try to thread the machine with the presser foot down, the tension disks are engaged or tight and will not ...
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HOW TO CHECK THE TOP THREAD TENSION AND INTERPRET THE RESULTS

Posted by Myra Bosch on Saturday, January 9, 2010, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

Is your embroidery machine too tense, a little high-strung, always going off at the smallest thing? Or is it too laid back, lackadaisical and lazy about its job? Or is it on a nice even, steady-as-she-sews path?

If the top thread tension is off on your machine, your embroidery will never be right, no matter how diligent you are about changing needles, choosing thread, hooping and selecting only quality digitized designs. Your work will not be up to par if the top thread tension is out.

Here's h...
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HOW TO ENSURE CORRECT THREAD TENSIONS

Posted by Myra Bosch on Saturday, October 24, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

A good way for beginners (or those who knew and forgot) to check their tensions is to look at the back of the embroidery. About 1/3 of the thread - the center third -should be bobbin. If the bobbin thread spreads to the edge, then either your top tension is too tight, or your bobbin tension is too loose. Conversely, if not very much bobbin shows, your top tension is too loose or your bobbin tension is too tight.

If you have more than one needle per head, here is how you can determine which ten...
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HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN THREAD COASTER

Posted by Myra Bosch on Saturday, October 24, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 
 
The small tubes of rayon, and even some of the older cones as well, can be a bit tricky to work with. The thread has a tendency to want to come off the tube in one large pile. As a result the thread gets caught underneath the remaining thread on the tube, causing thread breaks.

One technique to avoid this problem is to use a thread coaster or create your own. Similar to a beverage coaster, a thread coaster provides a surface for the thread on the tube to sit on, preventing it from getting tra...
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Stick to One Thread Type

Posted by Myra Bosch on Sunday, October 18, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

Avoid switching thread types on your machine if you can possibly help it. An example would be to use polyester thread in black on one job and rayon thread in black for another job. The machine tensioners actually get used to one type of thread and like a child, it has fits when you make a change in its habits!

It is better to stick to one thread type. Your tension requirement for polyester is much tighter than for rayon and if you are constantly changing thread types; so is your tension and i...
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How to keep track of Machine Embroidery Needle Changes

Posted by Myra Bosch on Sunday, October 18, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 
When you change a needle on your embroidery machine, do you remember what needle bar you changed? Do you remember what size or type of needle you used? When was the last time you changed your needles? Do you have to change your needle more often on one needle bar or on one needle bar on one head?

Having a system in place is very important for keeping track of your needle changes.

If you have a single head, this is simple and very easy to do. You can design a form called a Needle Replacement She...
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Trouble shooting machine embroidery problems

Posted by Myra Bosch on Thursday, October 15, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

•    Thread Breaks - Causes:  incorrect needle, burrs in needle eye, hook or throat plate, machine threaded incorrectly, incorrect needle bar height, tension adjustment needed, bent needle, machine needs lubrication, lint buildup, incorrect digitizing causing design to be too dense in an area, need for a silicon spray due to friction caused by thick fabrics or fabrics with treatments, pooling of thread which causes portions of the spool to wind off improperly.
•    Needle Breakage - Causes...
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Don't damage your Sewing Machine unknowingly

Posted by Myra Bosch on Wednesday, October 14, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 
A sewing machine depends on the smallest, most replaceable part to form perfect stitches. The needle!

The needle in turn depends on all the other parts of the sewing machine to be able to create those perfect stitches. What you may not realize that YOU, the machine operator, have to allow the parts of the sewing machine to do their job. Most of us do not realize we are forcing the fabric through the machine and creating our own problems in the process.

One of the most common culprits is that ...
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Tips for embroidering on dark coloured fabric

Posted by Myra Bosch on Saturday, August 29, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 
Dark coloured articles such as towels can be difficult to embroider.

Firstly, it is important to decide whether the design is to be a prominent feature on the article or merely used to break the monotony of the fabric's texture.  If the embroidery is to be a prominent feature, a contrasting colour is recommended eg.a yellow on a dark brown, or a leaf green or gold on black.  A good rule of thumb is to use a warm colour on a cool one or vice versa.

If the embroidery's function is to break the m...
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Why you should stick to the Same Thread Type

Posted by Mireille Bosch on Wednesday, August 26, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

Avoid switching thread types on your machine if you can possibly help it. An example would be to use polyester thread in black on one job and rayon thread in black for another job. The machine tensioners actually get used to one type of thread and like a child, it has fits when you make a change in its habits!

It is better to stick to one thread type. Your tension requirement for polyester is much tighter than for rayon and if you are constantly changing thread types; so is your tension...

Continue reading ...
 

Embroidery Stitches that Unravel

Posted by Myra Bosch on Sunday, August 23, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

If you have ever had problems with stitches that come out after you've trimmed thread tails or jump stitches, check the design on screen.

Zoom in and look at your "tie off" or "lock stitches" at the end of the letter, design or colour change. Sometimes they're non-existent, which explains why the raveling is taking place.

Often they are placed one on top of the other, so what you really get is a knotted thread extending from the fabric and design. It's all too easy to clip this off, plus, it d...

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Reasons for Embroidery Thread Breaks

Posted by Myra Bosch on Sunday, August 23, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

Many things on an embroidery machine can cause thread breaks, but not all are obvious.

BACKING - Excessive backing material used by inexperienced operators can cause thread breaks. If an operator uses three to four sheets of backing, stiffer embroidery is the result, but it also applies a great deal of friction to the needle, causing thread breaks. Needle drag is when backing is too thick and rigid; it normally is abrasive or adhesive, causing "drag" on the needle. The needle overheats and con...

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Correct Embroidery Thread Tensions

Posted by Myra Bosch on Sunday, August 23, 2009, In : Machine Embroidery Problems 

A good way for beginners (or those who knew and forgot) to check their tensions is to look at the back of the embroidery. About 1/3 of the thread - the center third -should be bobbin. If the bobbin thread spreads to the edge, then either your top tension is too tight, or your bobbin tension is too loose. Conversely, if not very much bobbin shows, your top tension is too loose or your bobbin tension is too tight.

If you have more than one needle per head, here is how you can determine which ten...

Continue reading ...
 
 

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